Man, the Ten of Swords does not screw around.

Betrayal, sure.

I had a feeling my body was going to be what betrayed me, because that’s generally how it goes. The only thing I enjoyed less than being correct about this was waking up so dizzy I couldn’t see, and spending several hours hunched over a trash can feeling simultaneously certain I was going to die and terrified I was not. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension carries a risk of stroke, which freaked me out for a bit, but most of my face was working okay so I figured that wasn’t it. Why’d this happen? No idea — I just woke up like that.

It was frustrating. It was disheartening. It was pretty much exactly what I’d been warned about.

(Enough about that, though, because it’s gross and I want to stop thinking about it.)

I did get a lot of reassurance afterward, though. I drew cards related to healing, cleansing, and optimism. I even saw a tiny hummingbird pause and hover right outside my window, which I thought was pretty impressive considering I live in a walk-up with no outdoor space to speak of. As long as I’ve lived in this area, I’ve never seen a hummingbird here before — if I hadn’t looked at the right moment, I would’ve missed him entirely!

Anyway, this week’s one-card reading felt a little more familiar. I admit, it was supremely weird to pull the Ten of Swords last week. I usually get such good news relating to what I’m up to or things I’m working on, to have my primary deck suddenly go all “DANGER, WILL ROBINSON” at me was extra unsettling. I get a lot of cups and wands. When I do draw something from the suit of swords, it’s usually a court card.

All of this is to say that I drew the Knight of Wands and I’m feeling a lot better.

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Knight of Wands from the Rider-Waite-Smith tarot deck, artwork by Pamela Coleman Smith.

The Knight of Wands is a person (or, in this case, bird) of action, like all of the Knights. This card represents the pursuit of an idea, and the drive and energy needed to bring a vision to fruition. By that same token, it also represents looking before you leap. Unlike the Knight of Pentacles, the Knight of Wands is not patient and definitely not into conservative courses of action.

This card comes at a pretty good time — my S.O. and I finished a book not too long ago, and are now working on what needs to be done to turn it into something other people can (and might actually want to) read. It’s taken a lot of planning and strategizing already, so I definitely don’t feel like we’re acting on impulse here. Rather, the Knight of Wands seems to represent the desire and ability to actually act on the plans we’ve been sitting on for so long!

… I’m not gonna lie, though, I’m just happy it wasn’t the Ten of Swords again.

 

 

 

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The Ten of Cups

Hello! It’s been a month(ish) since I last posted. I’m sorry about that.

I do have a pretty good reason for dropping off of the face of the earth, though — sort of a combination of managing my health and that thing where you’re not supposed to tell people you’re doing a thing, because you’ll get the same emotional high from talking about it as you would from actually doing it and then end up never actually finishing it.

Anyway, in my time away I finished two paintings and one book, written collaboratively with my awesome and creative S.O. So that’s neat.

He and I have no idea how and if it will ever be published, but, thus far, beta readers have received it well. After getting the first round of feedback, we’ll have to seek out an editor, and then decide how we want to progress.

(It is a very long, drawn out, complicated process, and I am glad he has elected to handle most of it. I got to compile everything, make the initial edits, and format it all into a readable manuscript.)

Even if no publisher wants it and nothing comes of it, it’s certainly a good feeling to look at your writing and be able to say you’ve finished a full-length novel.

So, I wasn’t that surprised when I pulled the Ten of Cups this week.

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Ten of Cups from the Rider-Waite tarot, artwork by Pamela Coleman Smith.

The suit of Cups speaks of emotional fulfillment, and Tens are the completion of a cycle. They’re the ultimate culmination, So, it’s probably unsurprising that the Ten of Cups, then, speaks of joy, peace, and happiness. It’s contentment, emotional security, and an abundance of love. Though the artwork varies from deck to deck, it usually depicts a couple joyfully surveying a landscape replete with signs of luck and happiness — a rainbow, flowers, sunshine, rolling hills, a neat little house, you name it. It’s one of the most positive cards in the deck.

Working with my S.O. on what has ultimately been a labor of love for the both of us has been a trip. We started writing collaboratively as a way to roleplay — acting out little scenes between the two of us when distance, money, time, or health didn’t let us go on many adventures. This practice evolved into a setting with deep lore, eons of history, its own cosmology, and a tremendously varied cast of characters. To be honest, last we counted, we’d written enough for several novels and two or three anthologies of short stories, but this is the first we’ve felt confident enough to put through the process of turning it into something actual.

I feel like it’s a bit like having a baby, only nobody had to throw up for months, we still get to sleep afterward, and everyone’s perinea stayed intact. So probably not actually much like having a baby.

Hopefully, when all the hurly-burly’s done, I’ll be able to share it with you, too.

Automatic Asemic

Note: This post contains affiliate links to the book(s) I mention. These allow me to earn a small finder’s fee from Wordery.com, at no cost to you. Thank you for helping to support writers, publishers, and this site! 

Sometimes, writing can be a visual art form.

Not the same way logo design or typography are — just the shape and flow of text itself. The letters don’t have to spell anything, they don’t even have to be letters (just look at the beautifully evocative text of the Codex Seraphinianus) in order to have meaning.

A portion of a page from the Codex Seraphinianus.

A portion of a page from the Codex Seraphinianus.

In the Codex Seraphinianus, the artist chose to use an invented language that doesn’t map to an existing one — while he invented an alphabet to write in, these letters join together to form words that don’t mean anything. The overall feeling is of being a young child who has gotten a hold of some beautiful and inexplicable book. The child knows the words mean things to those who can read them, and it feels like there is a whole secret world of knowledge there for the unlocking. But, without that kernel of understanding — without some way to turn the jumble of shapes into something that makes sense — there is a perpetually tantalizing, mysterious feeling of knowledge kept just out of reach.

In its primary role, written language is bound by semantics. C with an A followed by a T spells “cat,” and you know the sounds each letter stands for and the small, furry animal to which they refer. Asemic writing is writing unbound by semantics. It has meaning, it can be interpreted, but these things are not subject to the rules and logic of reading. The shapes and repetition of letters are treated as a pattern, neither more nor less than the fronds of a fern or the shapes of Arabesque tile, and the feelings and images they evoke are what give them meaning. This necessarily varies from person to person — where one may read aggression in the slant of a garbled word, another may see exuberance — but this subjectivity does not mean asemic writing makes any less sense than language.

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A close up.

It’s just different. 

In some of the magical and spiritual disciplines I work with, language becomes more than its literal meaning, and asemic writing can be doubly so. You can take a sentence, strike out the vowels and repeating letters, then rearrange the remainder into a sigil used to focus energy and intention. A planchette can dash across a page, leaving the uncertain scrawls of a spirit in its wake, while a group of breathless observers try to find sense in the jumble of lines and shapes. Scrubbed of their literal meanings, freed from the restrictions of semantics, letters and words (or alien shapes that only suggest letters and words) can condense into something else.

There are whole areas of literature devoted to analyzing word choice. “Happy” may not always mean “joyful,” and “patience” may not always be virtuous, and its worthwhile to examine why someone chose the words that they did. Even when words no longer have meaning, this still applies. Asemic writing is still made up of the lines and arcs we associate with text, and their placement is never random — there are things to be read in the ascending slant of a line, or a ripe, bubblelike downward curve.

Even when you can’t read the words, there is meaning in them.

 

 

 

 

5 Crystals for Creativity

Note: This post contains affiliate links to some of the stones I talk about. They allow me to earn a small finder’s fee, at no additional cost to you. Thank you for helping to support independent artists and artisans, as well as this site!

Creative blocks. We get ’em, we hate ’em. The feeling of grasping for an idea is never fun — words and images seem just out of reach, and we know that if we could just get something down, we’d be able to take it from there.

If you deal with the occasional block, or just want some help channeling your creative impulses, try keeping some of these stones in your work space:

Sodalite

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Blue sodalite beads.

Sodalite is said to promote logic and rationality, but it has a ton of other properties that make it a useful tool in the artist’s arsenal. It’s ability to help balance emotions and soothe panicky feelings can help combat those times when a blank page feels too intimidating. Use it when you need to calm anxiety and trust yourself to create beautiful things.

Check out some beautiful, large sodalite specimens at RockParadise.

Golden Rutilated Quartz

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Golden rutilated quartz is clear quartz filled with golden “hairs” of rutile. It’s an uplifting stone, and is said to help clear energetic blockages. As a form of clear quartz, it can be programmed with your intentions, while the golden rutile needles within it help to stimulate creativity and invite divine inspiration.

Check out some very pretty pieces of tumbled golden rutilated quartz, also at RockParadise.

Lodolite

Lodolite it my favorite stone, bar none. It, like golden rutilated quartz, is another form of quartz with inclusions of other minerals. However, while rutilated quartz contains characteristic needles of rutile, lodolite can contain any number of different minerals, often in patterns that resemble miniature landscapes. (Hence three of its other names — garden, landscape, or scenic quartz.)

Lodolite is a great stone for enhancing communication, and is especially helpful if a trance or trancelike state is part of your creative process. It’s powers of manifestation can combine here to help you achieve a creative trance, communicate the ideas that come to you, and manifest the creative works in your heart.

Check out some really stunning lodolite teardrops at MagiMinerals.

Citrine

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A citrine cluster made of heat-treated amethyst.

Is any stone happier or more effervescent than citrine? I’ve never met one I didn’t like. Using citrine can help connect you to a very joyful energy. It also helps promote the easy flow of ideas, ideal for creative brainstorming sessions, and enhances clarity and visualization. It’s a very bright, energetic stone. Any form of citrine will do, but those that haven’t had their color artificially enhanced seem to work the best.

Check out some polished, natural citrine points at RockParadise.

Herkimer Diamonds

Fortunately for us, Herkimer diamonds are not diamonds — they’re actually a type of double-terminated quartz. While double-terminated quartz can be found anywhere, though, these are specifically from around Herkimer, New York.

These stones are potent. Like golden rutilated quartz, they help remove blockages to promote the free flow of energy. It’s considered a powerful stone for workplaces, attracting positive attention (and, with it, money). It’s also said to “boost” other stones, helping small stones to act like much larger ones. Most Herkimer diamonds are small, but they don’t need to be big to pack a wallop.

Check out some lovely Herkimer diamonds at BlissCrystals.
Creativity can be a fickle thing, but not all of us can work on its timetable. (Personally, I can’t tell you how many times I’ve been handed an order from a client on a day when the words just. Were. Not. Flowing.) With some discipline and a little help unblocking our energies and getting the creative juices flowing again, we can overcome blocks and keep the ideas coming.